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The Wellthy Balance

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FMU: Share the Happy

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Bonsai trees can grow for thousands of years. If well kept, they can grow very old. How long does a bonsai tree live for? Some of the oldest Bonsai in the world are over 800 years; the result of many generations of patience and hard work.

In general, they symbolize harmony, peace, order of thoughts, balance and all that is good in nature.

The word “Bon-sai” (often misspelled as bonzai or banzai) is a Japanese term which, literally translated, means “planted in a container”

FMU: Food for Wealth – Red Bell Peppers

Bell peppers are rich in many vitamins and antioxidants, especially vitamin C and various carotenoids. For this reason, eating them may have several health benefits, such as improved eye health, and reduced risk of several chronic diseases.

FMU News: What do the numbers 3,4, 8 and 9 have to do with your health and wellness?

Hey there!

You know those little stickers on fruits and veggies? They’re called price look-up (PLU) codes and they contain numbers that cashiers use to ring you up. But you can also use them to make sure you’re getting what you paid for. If you are interested in staying healthy, click here to read Dr. Grisanti’s free article  https://www.functionalmedicineuniversity.com/public/1290.cfm and you’ll learn exactly what to look for … hope you enjoy the read.

Wishing you a wellthy day And! remember to SHARE THE HAPPY 😉

 

 

 

Simply Yumful: Spinach, mushroom and quinoa bowl

Easy Mediterranean side dish recipe made with spinach, mushrooms, quinoa and garlic.  Perfect as a meatless entree, too.  Healthy, low in carbs and calories, high in fiber, vegetarian, and gluten free. Prep time: 10 mins Cook time: 20 mins Click here for the full recipe Julia’s Album

Enjoy the yumfulness and remember to SHARE ThE HAPPY!

FMU Food for wellth!: Oh My Toadstool!

Mushrooms are packed with nutritional value. They’re low in calories, are great sources of fiber and protein (good for plant-based diets). They also provide many important nutrients, including B vitamins, selenium, potassium, copper, and (particularly when exposed to the sun) vitamin D

SOVFY Show Me Your Yumyums!: Ananas comosus

Pineapple contains compounds that reduce oxidative stress and inflammation, both of which are linked to cancer. One of these compounds is the enzyme bromelain, which may stimulate cell death in certain cancer cells and aid white blood cell function. Oh my wellthy!

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